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Escaping Alaska - Netflix

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Escaping Alaska follows a group of young Eskimos (Nuala, Mary, Tamara, Frank, and Q) as they leave their villages for the first time and secretly escape to San Diego, defying the expectations of their families in order to experience life beyond the harsh realities of Alaska. They are a generation torn between their deep-rooted cultural traditions and the modern pop culture of the lower 48 states. This is their story of independence, survival, adventure and forming a new family. Leaving an Inuit community for any earthly reason is difficult, so our cast members are lying about their true intentions, telling their community that they are going on a cultural/religious mission.

Escaping Alaska - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2014-07-27

Escaping Alaska - History of Alaska - Netflix

The history of Alaska dates back to the Upper Paleolithic period (around 14,000 BC), when wanderer groups crossed the Bering land bridge into what is now western Alaska. At the time of European contact by the Russian explorers, the area was populated by Alaska Native groups. The name “Alaska” derives from the Aleut word Alaxsxaq (also spelled Alyeska), meaning “mainland” (literally, “the object toward which the action of the sea is directed”). The U.S. purchased Alaska from Russia in 1867. In the 1890s, gold rushes in Alaska and the nearby Yukon Territory brought thousands of miners and settlers to Alaska. Alaska was granted territorial status in 1912 by the United States of America. In 1942, two of the outer Aleutian Islands—Attu and Kiska—were occupied by the Japanese and their recovery for the U.S. became a matter of national pride. The construction of military bases contributed to the population growth of some Alaskan cities. Alaska was granted U.S. statehood on January 3, 1959. In 1964, the massive “Good Friday earthquake” killed 131 people and leveled several villages. The 1968 discovery of oil at Prudhoe Bay and the 1977 completion of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline led to an oil boom. In 1989, the Exxon Valdez hit a reef in Prince William Sound, spilling between 11 and 34 million US gallons (42,000 and 130,000 m³) of crude oil over 1,100 miles (1,600 km) of coastline. Today, the battle between philosophies of development and conservation is seen in the contentious debate over oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Escaping Alaska - 18th century - Netflix

Escaping Alaska - References - Netflix